The Periodic Table – Elementary So Far…

Periodic_Table_of_ElementsMendeleev’s Periodic Table of Elements

In 1869, Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev (1834-1907) proposed the first widely recognised periodic table of elements.  He developed his table to illustrate periodic trends in the properties of the then-known elements.  Mendeleev also predicted some properties of then-unknown elements that would be expected to fill the gaps in this table.  Most of his predictions were proved correct when the elements in question were subsequently discovered.

Mendeleev’s periodic table has since been expanded and refined with the discovery or synthesis of further new elements and the development of new theoretical models to explain their physical and chemical behaviour.

 

Atomic Numbers

From atomic numbers 1 (hydrogen) to 118 (ununoctium), all elements have been discovered or reportedly synthesised, including recently-discovered elements 113, 115, 117, and 118.

The first 98 elements exist naturally although some are found only in trace amounts and were initially discovered by synthesis in laboratories.  Elements with atomic numbers from 99 to 118 have only been synthesised, or claimed to be so, in laboratories. Production of elements having higher atomic numbers is being pursued, with the question of how the periodic table may need to be modified to accommodate any such additions being a matter of ongoing debate. Numerous synthetic radio-nuclides of naturally occurring elements have also been produced in laboratories.

NameSymbolAtomic #AppearanceFeature
HydrogenH1

At the Heart of the Hydrogen Atom...


Olivine ? Squeezing Hydrogen from Stone and Capturing Carbon

HeliumHe2

Helium - Lighter than Air

LithiumLi3

Salted Earth - At one Corner of the Lithium Triangle

BerylliumBe4
BoronB5
CarbonC6

Graphite to Graphene? in a Kitchen Blender

NitrogenN7

Nitrogen - Nature\'s Explosive Building Blocks

OxygenO8
FluorineF9
NeonNe10
SodiumNa11
MagnesiumMg12
AluminiumAl13
SiliconSi14
PhosphorusP15
SulfurS16
ChlorineCl17
ArgonAr18
PotassiumK19
CalciumCa20

Yes, Calcium is a Metal!

ScandiumSc21
TitaniumTi22
VanadiumV23
ChromiumCr24
ManganeseMn25
IronFe26
CobaltCo27
NickelNi28
CopperCu29Fuelling our Lust for Copper - Mining in Afghanistan...
ZincZn30
GalliumGa31
GermaniumGe32
ArsenicAs33
SeleniumSe34
BromineBr35
KryptonKr36
RubidiumRb37The Bizarre Behaviour of Negative Mass
StrontiumSr38
YttriumY39
ZirconiumZr40
NiobiumNb41
MolybdenumMo42
TechnetiumTc43
RutheniumRu44
RhodiumRh45
PalladiumPd46
SilverAg47
CadmiumCd48
IndiumIn49
TinSn50Little Tin Soldiers of Indonesia
AntimonySb51
TelluriumTe52
IodineI53
XenonXe54
CaesiumCs55
BariumBa56
LanthanumLa57
CeriumCe58
PraseodymiumPr59
NeodymiumNd60
PromethiumPm61
SamariumSm62
EuropiumEu63
GadoliniumGd64
TerbiumTb65
DysprosiumDy66
HolmiumHo67
ErbiumEr68
ThuliumTm69
YtterbiumYb70
LutetiumLu71
HafniumHf72
TantalumTa73
TungstenW74
RheniumRe75
OsmiumOs76
IridiumIr77
PlatinumPt78
GoldAu79
MercuryHg80Mercury: Beautiful Poison
ThalliumTl81
LeadPb82
BismuthBi83
PoloniumPo84
AstatineAt85
RadonRn86
FranciumFr87
RadiumRa88
ActiniumAc89
ThoriumTh90
ProtactiniumPa91
UraniumU92
NeptuniumNp93
PlutoniumPu94
AmericiumAm95
CuriumCm96
BerkeliumBk97
CaliforniumCf98
EinsteiniumEs99
FermiumFm100
MendeleviumMd101
NobeliumNo102
LawrenciumLr103
RutherfordiumRf104
DubiumDb105
SeaborgiumSg106
BohriumBh107
HassiumHs108
MeitneriumMt109
DarmstadtiumDs110
RoentgeniumRg111
CoperniciumCn112
UnuntriumUut113You Wait Ages for a Chemical Element, and Then? BINGO!!
FleroviumFl114
UnunpentiumUup115You Wait Ages for a Chemical Element, and Then? BINGO!!
LivermoriumLv116
UnunseptiumUus117You Wait Ages for a Chemical Element, and Then? BINGO!!
UnunoctiumUuo118You Wait Ages for a Chemical Element, and Then? BINGO!!

 

Little 'Bytes' about Natural Phenomena, Theoretical Physics and the Latest Worldwide Scientific Findings. Edited from Glasgow, Scotland.

 

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